The secret behind the ticking mind of a volunteer, by Jorge Moll

Jorge Moll Neto is a Brazilian physician and neuroscientist. He is mainly interested magnetic resonance imaging to find out the psychological and neurological mechanisms that govern people to make decisions. Jorge Moll is also the CEO of D’Or Institute for Research and Education, IDOR. These decisions may range from day-to-day life choices and social preferences. Jorge Moll seeks to identify how human decisions are related to morals, culture, values, and neurotechnological intrusions.

 

It is perplexing to think about what goes on in the human brain to trigger gestures like inspiration during the Christmas period and offering oneself for volunteer work. It is said that helping others is beneficial to one’s heart if this is done generously. These acts of generosity do not necessarily have to be grand, even small gestures like helping a stranger out, does the body and mind well.

 

Jorge Moll explains that the subgenual cortex and septal area in the brain are responsible for bringing the feeling of attachment and belonging to human beings. It is this feeling of attachment that enables a mother take care of her child (idor.org). These two regions in the brain are also responsible for the union found between couples. When someone reacts in a way that favors a particular cause or action, a system that was developed millions of years ago in the name of fostering family and friendship ties is activated.

 

Recent studies show that volunteering for social causes reduces the risk of developing various health conditions, such as depression and heart complications. Through volunteer work, you may be able to promote your own well-being as well as for those who are around you.

 

All human beings undergo various difficulties during their lives. For a person who practices volunteer work, having to help others takes the focus off the underlying problem and refreshes the mind. This enables the person to see the world in a different form. Volunteer work helps people in realizing that they are not alone. The same way they look at other people’s obstacles is the same way someone else is looking after their own impediments. This motivation gives all volunteers the courage to continue with persevering.

More about Jorge Moll at http://moll-lab.org/our-team/jorge-moll